Earl Mindell, RPh, PhD, is a registered pharmacist, master herbalist, and college educator. He is also an award-winning author of over twenty best-selling books, including Earl Mindell's New Vitamin Bible, which has sold over 11 million copies worldwide. Dr. Mindell was inducted into the California Pharmacists Association’s Hall of Fame in 2007, and was awarded the President's Citation for Exemplary Service from Bastyr University in 2012. He is on the Board of Directors of the California College of Natural Medicine, and serves on the Dean's Professional Advisory Group, School of Pharmacy, Chapman University. In addition to being a highly sought-after lecturer, he has appeared on numerous TV shows such as Good Morning America and the Late Show with David Letterman. He and his wife reside in Beverly Hills, California.
Earl Mindell, RPh, PhD, is a registered pharmacist, master herbalist, and college educator. He is also an award-winning author of over twenty best-selling books, including Earl Mindell's New Vitamin Bible, which has sold over 11 million copies worldwide. Dr. Mindell was inducted into the California Pharmacists Association’s Hall of Fame in 2007, and was awarded the President's Citation for Exemplary Service from Bastyr University in 2012. He is on the Board of Directors of the California College of Natural Medicine, and serves on the Dean's Professional Advisory Group, School of Pharmacy, Chapman University. In addition to being a highly sought-after lecturer, he has appeared on numerous TV shows such as Good Morning America and the Late Show with David Letterman. He and his wife reside in Beverly Hills, California.
With her departure on Feb. 10, there are only two commissioners remaining on the FTC and the acting chairwoman, Republican Maureen Ohlhausen, is a staunch supporter of self-regulation by MLMs. Trump will appoint three new FTC commissioners, including the chairperson. Whether it’s Ohlhausen or someone else, the next chairperson is also likely to be sympathetic to the MLM cause. The only name floated for the spot so far has been Republican Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes, who was also greeted with glee by MLM shareholders when his consideration was reported by Politico on Jan. 17.
In an October 15, 2010 article, it was stated that documents of a MLM called Fortune reveal that 30 percent of its representatives make no money and that 54 percent of the remaining 70 percent only make $93 a month. The article also states Fortune is under investigation by the Attorneys General of Texas, Kentucky, North Dakota, and North Carolina with Missouri, South Carolina, Illinois, and Florida following up complaints against the company. In 2013, the FTC's court-appointed receiver determined that Fortune was nothing but an illegal recruitment MLM and that least 88 % of the members did not even recoup their enrollment fees and that more then 98% had lost more money then they ever made.[54][55] Refund checks mailed out totaled over $3.7 million.[56]

I’m truly sympathetic to this desire. A lot of folks are struggling financially out there; Dad’s salary alone isn’t enough to support the family (or he’s out of work altogether), and Mom getting a job may not be a big help once the cost of childcare is factored in. Plus, a lot of moms simply don’t want to send their kids to childcare and want to be able to stay home with their children.

These sales go against company policy. While a LuLaRoe spokesperson says sellers are “free to set their own sales prices for the LuLaRoe products they sell,” they don’t allow you to actually advertise those prices: “Out of fairness to all retailers, they are not allowed to advertise prices below MAP (Minimum Advertised Prices). LuLaRoe encourages retailers not sell product below MAP as MAP ensure that the LuLaRoe brand maintains a consistent level of value and fairness that benefits all Retailers. Advertising prices below MAP violates the agreement between retailers and LuLaRoe.” If caught, sellers are ostracized by the consultant community for diminishing the LuLaRoe brand, and some have claimed to be locked out of their point-of-sale systems.
The end result of the MLM business model is, therefore, one of a company (the MLM company) selling its products and services through a non-salaried workforce ("partners") working for the MLM company on a commission-only basis while the partners simultaneously constitute the overwhelming majority of the very consumers of the MLM company's products and services that they, as participants of the MLM, are selling to each other in the hope of one day themselves being at the top of the pyramid. This creates great profit for the MLM company's actual owners and shareholders.
Walter J. Carl stated in a 2004 Western Journal of Communication article that "MLM organizations have been described by some as cults (Butterfield, 1985),[51] pyramid schemes (Fitzpatrick & Reynolds, 1997),[52] or organizations rife with misleading, deceptive, and unethical behavior (Carter, 1999),[53] such as the questionable use of evangelical discourse to promote the business (Höpfl & Maddrell, 1996),[54] and the exploitation of personal relationships for financial gain (Fitzpatrick & Reynolds, 1997)".[52][55] In China, volunteers working to rescue people from the schemes have been physically attacked.[56]
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De firma Tupperware, een van de eerste bedrijven die in de jaren 60 via de 'Tupperware-parties' direct marketing in Nederland introduceerde, wordt vaak als MLM-bedrijf genoemd maar is dat gezien haar structuur niet. De aangesloten zelfstandige consulenten zijn in maximaal twee 'levels' opgedeeld. Een echte piramidestructuur ontbreekt.[2] In de jaren zestig ontstonden ook de eerste organisaties voor belangenbehartiging van netwerkmarketing in onder andere België, Duitsland, Frankrijk, Groot-Brittannië en Italie.[3]
What this all adds up to, in the eyes of opponents and supporters, is a benign era for MLMs. Regulating these companies, with their legions of independent salespeople, is difficult for the toughest regulatory regimes. And the Trump era will be anything but that. “Anybody who would continue to expect or hope for law enforcement regarding financial schemes of this type would be living in a dream world,” said Robert FitzPatrick, the president of the watchdog Pyramid Scheme Alert. “[MLMs] are going to gain protection.”
Stern jumped in during the heyday phase of a MLM when the people at the top grew rich, and quick. By the start of 2017, nine months after Stern joined, LuLaRoe was pushing 80,000 independent retailers. According to interviews with several consultants, this is also the time when sales suddenly became tougher: The hundreds of thousands of ravenous customers who once clamored to buy leggings from 10,000 consultants flipped in less than a year to eight times that amount selling to just a fraction of the clients. The scales began to tip.

Our family has been making healthy oils and supplements in the Pacific Northwest for nearly 30 years. As a leader in the natural foods industry, we stake our reputation on innovating and creating the quality products our customers have come to expect. And like all of our products, our Ideal CBD Hemp Oil meets the very highest standards of excellence.
Some multi-level marketing companies promise high income and rewards for little effort or money. Your motivation should be more than simply making money (Hebrews 13:5–6). Proverbs warns about the desire to make quick money (Proverbs 12:11). While employers should reasonably compensate for labor (Luke 10:7), our primary focus should not be on what we receive. As Christians, our life focus on giving should also be reflected in our chosen occupation in which we seek to give to others through our work.
For most people, thankfully, the MLM experience usually ends in very quick financial failure and is then sidelined. Two possible responses are: 1) being embarrassed about participation, or 2) becoming even more intractable when the MLM has failed. You will find the latter chasing after the latest "get rich quick" scheme with similar results. "If we could have just sponsored so and so--they have so many friends--we would have made it."
Amway stresses that the main difference between a legitimate MLM business model and a pyramid scheme is that a legitimate MLM is focused on selling products, not recruiting more salespeople. In a legitimate MLM, it should be possible to make money by simply selling products directly to customers. With that main criterion in mind, here are some other ways to identify product-based pyramid schemes:
The basic question that needs to be asked is this: If this product or service is so great, then why isn't it being sold through the customary marketing system that has served human society for thousands of years? Why does it need to resort to a "special marketing" scheme like an MLM? Why does everyone need to be so inexperienced at marketing this! Is the product just a thin cover for what is really a pyramid scheme of exploiting others? But more on that later.
Hemp oil is an abundant source of alpha-linolenic acid. Alpha-linolenic acid is an omega-3 fatty acid that is essential to proper organ function. It is similar to the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil, and can help prevent heart disease, arthritis and depression, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. It can also help reduce low density lipoprotein cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol that clogs arteries.
I've been suffering from anxiety for a while now and thought I'd try this... I drink tea regularly and decided to put it in my zen tea. The peppermint flavor in it compliments really well and I've noticed a decline in my anxiety. Its honestly such a nice soothing relief. I would recommend this to anyone who suffers from anxiety and wants a natural remedy.

"Mindell looks at the important role the hemp plant has played in both Easter and Western societies . . . offers an eye-opening examination of hemp's legal status in the United States, from the 1900s to now . . . presents an A-to-Z guide to the many uses of hemp oil and CBD for various health conditions, from arthritis to depression to heart disease . . . guides the non-specialist general reader in using this all-natural substance as a safe, side effect-free remedy, making it very highly recommended for personal, community, and academic library collections."

As a representative with 2 companies that have CBD on the market and as a person with intractable pain and multple painful problems wirth my spine I can say that cbd does not work for everyone. It does nothing for me or for my mil who has a cancer like growth impeding her ability to swallow and has undergone radiation to shrink it. Everyone has a chemistry that’s personal to them for some it helps but for many it does not. With that in mind it’s a 50/50 chance of it helping and until you come out your pocket you’ll never know. Buyer beware.

Tracy Willard of California began her MLM career out of necessity.  “Prior to getting involved in my business, I told my friends to never let me join one of those things… but when our family was hit by the mortgage crisis I had to do something different.”  She started her business with the intention some retirees may also find themselves.  “I started with the idea that I just needed to make my month easier.  My company helped me figure out what I needed to do in order to make an extra $500 per month.”


When hemp is imported from other countries, there’s a lack of regulation and transparency behind the quality control. Majority of CBD products on the market are still imported from countries like China and Eastern Europe. This is because there is not enough hemp grown in the US to supply the growing demand for CBD. It’s also cheaper and more lucrative for businesses to import CBD oil from these foreign countries.
FitzPatrick will get no quarrel from the industry’s biggest fans. “We think that with the new administration you can forget any aggressive action vs. MLMs,” industry analyst and Herbalife shareholder Tim Ramey wrote in a note to clients in January. “When Betsy DeVos was named to the Trump Cabinet we took that as a very strong signal that the Trump administration had no real issue with the MLM world. … You don’t put Betsy DeVos in your cabinet and then go out and try to put [Herbalife] out of business. We are in a post-regulatory world.”
Kayla lives in a small town in Wisconsin. She’s single, 27, childless, and in grad school. In late 2015 she was working as an administrative assistant at an office earning $32,000 a year when a sorority sister from college invited her to a LuLaRoe in-home party. She was initially resistant to the very idea of leggings as pants, but she walked away with several dresses for $65 each. “I realized if they’re making the money that they say they’re making all over their Facebook pages and how it’s life changing, why can’t it change my life?” she says.
Those warning letters aside, there’s not a lot of federal oversight right now over the claims being made or the products that are being sold. Cohen warned against buying CBD products online, because “there’s a lot of scams out there.” Yet his clinic sells CBD, and he admits, “I say ‘Don’t buy online,’ but ours is worth doing, because we know what we’re doing. We ship all over.”
Thirty minutes later, I was surprised by how subtle the effect was. While I expected a hazy nodding-off effect similar to melatonin's, the oil simply relaxed my body ever so slightly—my heart stopped pounding against my chest, my legs stopped kicking beneath my sheets, my mind stopped racing. I wasn't sure if it was the oil or the late hour, but eventually, physical relaxation gave way to mental relaxation, and I drifted off to sleep.
As a means of moving capital from the bottom of the pyramid to the top, MLMs are very effective; their chief promoters and high-level members aren't lying when they boast of the money they've made from the scheme. However, as a business model (i.e., a means of creating and capturing capital), MLMs are hilariously ineffective - like a toddler imagining what it's like to start a business. Here are just a few of the reasons why.
While there are plenty of men who join MLMs, 75% of all participants are women. But that doesn’t mean that if you’re a dude you don’t need to understand exactly how MLMs work, as there’s a chance your wife will one day come to you with the idea of joining one. Hopefully you’ll have a conversation together about it, and hopefully, using the points we lay out below, you’ll be able to make the case that it’s a bad idea for her, and for your family.
Network marketing is a business model that depends upon a network of distributors for growth, such as in multilevel marketing. It is a direct selling method that features independent agents that make up a distribution network for goods and services. Some network marketing systems are based on tiers that denote how many levels deep a sales and distribution network goes. In two-tier or multi-tier examples, the people that make up the top tier of a distribution network are also encouraged to build and manage their own networks of salespeople. Each network creator (or "upline") then earns a commission on their sales revenue, as well as on the sales revenue of the network they have created, otherwise known as "downline." There are many examples of reputable network marketing operations, though some have been criticized of being pyramid schemes and have been banned in some countries as a conduit for consumer fraud.

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I placed my first order well over a month ago, but wanted to wait until I could give a more accurate review of Medterras CBD tincture. Ive dealt with the pain of fibromyalgia for many years, and never wanted to take the harsh prescription drugs usually associated with the condition (the side effects seem worse than living with the condition itself!). I did a great deal of research on hemp CBD and thought Id at least give it a try. I am both surprised and pleased to report that I have found a significant difference since taking CBD. Obviously, I cant say that it will work for everyone and every condition, but I will say that at least in my case, it has improved the quality of my body movement significantly. Certainly worth a try if you are at all hesitant.
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