Our hemp extracts may be extremely low in THC, but they are rich in terpenes. Terpenes are organic compounds and isomeric hydrocarbons (C10H16) found within hemp flower excretions. At Bluebird Botanicals, we develop the genetics for our hemp in highly-specialized Colorado greenhouses and source our crops from outdoor farms, which use organic growing methods and no pesticides. These farms cultivate specialty high-terpene hemp plants specifically bred to for the production of hemp and CBD oil.
Definitely not. Standard hemp oil, which can be found very cheaply at a grocery store, is a much different product than our full spectrum hemp extracts (not from seed). Standard hemp oil is produced by cold pressing the seeds, whereas our hemp extract is a full plant extraction with many components not typically found in the seeds. Hemp seed oil is considered to be a great nutritive food, but it doesn’t have the naturally occurring terpenes, cannabinoids and other components that our extracts do have.
I was so excited to try this but it hasn’t helped my back pain whatsoever. I’ve been taking it for 2 months and I’m going to give it one more month. I am taking the 500 and have doubled the dose making it 1000 mg. So disappointed.I thought in the beginning that it was giving me a little more energy. Maybe it has. I love the company. It is so easy to order and it’s shipped right away.

Let's just suppose that "X" has been reached today in a particular MLM; the number of possible units sold at this price has just been exceeded, and you happen to be a starry-eyed prospect sitting in an MLM meeting listening to the pitch. Now consider: Does anyone in this company know about "X"? Does anyone care? Is the issue being suppressed on purpose for some other motive? Since we are supposing that the market saturation number "X" has been reached, everyone joining the MLM from now on is buying into a false hope. But that is not what the speaker will be saying. He will be telling you, "Now is the time to join. Get in on the 'ground floor'." But it is all a lie, even though the speaker may not know it. The total available market "X" has been reached and nobody noticed. All the distributors will lose from here on out. Could this be you? How could you possibly know at what point you will become the liar in an MLM?
Identify the product. The whole idea of network marketing is to use direct salespeople to sell products or services to the end consumer. So if no product or service exists, and only money is changing hands, head for the door. Pyramids often disguise themselves as reputable MLMs by taking on a line of products and claiming to sell them to consumers. However, little time and effort is spent actually marketing the products because profits come from recruitment. Ask what sort of marketing is allowed. If the company resists using viable ways to notify the public about its products or services, look out. You may be in pyramid territory.
In recent months, sellers have claimed that LuLaRoe leggings have a tendency to tear like “wet toilet paper.” The $25 leggings—their most popular item—are manufactured in the US, Vietnam, Guatemala, Indonesia, and China, and are mostly made of a mix of polyester and spandex. Starting in fall 2016, customers started reporting that LuLaRoe’s “buttery soft” leggings were falling apart. Sometimes within just a few hours of wearing them, pinholes would splatter across the fabric, a “blow out” would reveal the wearer’s underwear, or they’d lose all their dye in the wash, leaving them a sad, mottled grey. LuLaRoe has denied that anything was wrong with its leggings, saying that only 1% of its clothing is returned with defects.
While normally I'd be slightly tripped up by little things like an overly crowded subway car or a full inbox at work, the CBD oil seems to have taken the edge off of my anxiety a bit. Rather than overthinking a sternly worded email or analyzing a social interaction, I've found it easier to recognize the irrationality of these thoughts and actually let them go (instead of ruminating on the situation). In some ways, I feel more like myself. With that said, I've still experienced some social anxiety when meeting new groups of people—I'd be interested to see what taking the full recommended dose would do.
Even ex-accountants are willing to practice the crudest of high-pressure selling tactics, at least when it comes to "signing people up." The end justifies the means, when it comes to getting people to come to the "meetings," where the objective is to get a materialism frenzy going at high pitch through a slick speaker or video. The reasons for this "confidence building" should be obvious by now, but here we are considering the relationship cost associated with the "success" of the MLM.

That figure may be low because LuLaRoe products used to be so hard to return. For a long time, angry customers couldn’t send back faulty products directly to LuLaRoe: They had to return them to the consultant they purchased them from. Customers are instructed to hand-wash leggings inside out and air-dry them, but that hasn’t stopped the company from getting sued by angry consultants alleging that the leggings are poor quality. Some LuLaRoe retailers have even taken to fat-shaming customers, telling them if the leggings rip, it’s their fault.
Stern jumped in during the heyday phase of a MLM when the people at the top grew rich, and quick. By the start of 2017, nine months after Stern joined, LuLaRoe was pushing 80,000 independent retailers. According to interviews with several consultants, this is also the time when sales suddenly became tougher: The hundreds of thousands of ravenous customers who once clamored to buy leggings from 10,000 consultants flipped in less than a year to eight times that amount selling to just a fraction of the clients. The scales began to tip.

Right now, MLMs are preying on lower-income, often undocumented immigrant communities and taking advantage of their lack of knowledge and finances. Their reps lure them in by telling that they are giving them the tools to start their own businesses and that they can create jobs for their friends and family members. In the 2016 documentary, Betting On Zero, director Ted Braun talks to several Latino families who have lost their entire life savings to Herbalife. They were told by MLM reps that it’s easy work and that it’s not dangerous, and so they sold their construction businesses to invest in Herbalife.


So-called "direct selling" and its bastard child, MLM, seem quaint and irrelevant - like print newspapers, typewriters or vinyl records. That's not to say there isn't a market for all these things; there is. But niche markets can never sustain the kind of infinite, boundless growth that's necessary for an MLM distributor to make the kind of money that's often advertised (unless they're at the top of the pyramid). Speaking of boundless growth, there's point #5...
But here is the problem that these whiteboard presentations always manage to omit. Of all the thousands of network marketing plans available now or in the past, if only one of them had ever had even a single line active to only 14 levels deep, that alone would have required the participation of more human beings than exist. That math is black and white, too. Level 14 is populated by 514, or about 6.1 billion people, the entire population of the planet, in addition to level 13 with 1.2 billion, all the way up to you and your original five. You can answer "Oh sure, but a lot of the people don't get all five or they flake somehow," but you forget that the entire premise has already eliminated those who flake or who don't get all five. The unfortunate conclusion is that a fully invested network, upon which the whiteboard presentations are dependent, has never actually happened.
According to numerous independent analyses and the MLM industry itself, the vast majority of MLM distributors make little to no money or lose money;[1] according to one researcher, "you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone [in network marketing] making more than $1.50 an hour".[9] Some MLM participants lose much more than just money, squandering social capital and damaging careers, reputations and relationships.[10]

The all-too-obvious point here is that management of supply and demand, and keen insight into realistic market penetration and saturation are crucial to any business, for any product or service. Mismanagement of this aspect of a business will eclipse good market access, excellent product design, human resource assets, production quality, and so on. Simply stated, a failure to "hit the target" of supply and demand can ruin a company if the market is oversaturated.
What if your body could absorb cannabidiol faster and easier than before? Elixinol™ CBD Oil Liposomes use pre-dissolved cannabidiol that is then added into the microscopic liposomes. The technology is safe and uses natural phospholipids, which research show supports healthy cellular delivery of CBD oil. Elixinol™ CBD Oil Liposomes uses full-spectrum hemp extracts, with no synthetic or isolated cannabinoids.

Our family has been making healthy oils and supplements in the Pacific Northwest for nearly 30 years. As a leader in the natural foods industry, we stake our reputation on innovating and creating the quality products our customers have come to expect. And like all of our products, our Ideal CBD Hemp Oil meets the very highest standards of excellence.


Network marketing is considered by many to be a form of direct selling (the person-to-person sale of goods or services). It utilizes a few different strategies to generate commission payments, such as recruiting, lead generation and management. Network marketing may be referred to by a variety of names, including "multilevel marketing," "cellular marketing," "affiliate marketing," "consumer direct marketing (CDM)," "referral marketing," "pyramid selling," or  "home-based business franchising."

For most MLMs, the product is really a mere diversion from the real profit-making dynamic. To anyone familiar with MLMs, the previous discussion (which focused so much on the fact that MLMs are "doomed by design" to reach market saturation and thus put the people who are legitimately trying to sell the product into a difficult situation) may seem to miss the point. The product or service may well be good, and it might oversaturate at some point, but let's get serious. The product is not the incentive to join an MLM. Otherwise people might have shown an interest in selling this particular product or service before in the real world. The product is the excuse to attempt to legitimate the real money-making engine. It's "the cover."
But even this discounted wholesale price is usually far higher than the market value of comparable products available from the supermarket. Participants nearly always find themselves in the unenviable position of having invested a lot of money in their own required inventory purchases, and desperately trying to recruit new distributors in an effort to earn commissions on their inventory purchases, and hopefully recover their own investment. So this raises the question: How often does it work out that way? How many MLM participants ever recover their own investments?
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CBD & THC are just 2 of many cannabiniods that will be seen on certificates of analysis; CBN for example is known to treat insomnia due to it’s sedating qualities & the list of terpenes, is long & each one has it’s own specific medicinal value. There’s a tremendous amount of learning involved with finding the right CBD product as well as the individual doseage; it’s advised for all beginners to “start slow & low”.
I am 70 years old and have arthritic pain and stiffness in my hands. I work part-time for a delivery company and spend 4-5 hour shifts removing small and large packages from a belt think of Lucy and Ethel at the chocolate factory. I bought the 3000 MG tincture about two weeks. I started out with 6 drops @ 2X per day 30MG. It took the edge off of aches and pains from working and arthritic pain but increased the dose to 7 drops @ 3 times per day 52.5 MG. Although I still felt some aches and pains it decreased considerably. Today I have started 7 drops 4X per day 75 MG. I anticipate getting much better results. All-in-all I am quite pleased with the 3000 tincture oil. I feel that the oil has given me more energy to do things around the house probably because I am now experiencing much fewer aches and pains in my body and hands. By the way the reason I am taking the oil 4 times a day is because I read that the body will not absorb more than 15 MG at a time and discards any oil above that amount. It may not be true but thats my story and Im sticking to it.
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